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Test Results

Ultralast products go under stringent testing, the majority of which are ISO standard tests. In some cases we have used inhouse tests developed and tested by the Reasearch Paint Association in the UK to effectively test specific qualities of our products.

ISO 7784-2 Test: Abrasion resistance

Deals with the sampling and testing of paints, varnishes and related products. Gives a method for the determination of the resistance to abrasion of a dried coating, using an abrasive rubber wheel and abrading by rotation.

ISO 2409 Test: Adhesion

Describes a test method for assessing the resistance of paint coatings to separation from substrates when a right-angle lattice pattern is cut into the coating, penetrating through to the substrate. The property measured by this empirical test procedure depends, among other factors, on the adhesion of the coating to either the preceding coat or the substrate.
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ISO 11507 Test: Artificial weathering

Specifies exposure conditions for paint coatings exposed to artificial weathering in apparatus including fluorescent UV lamps and condensation or water spray. The effects of weathering are evaluated separately by comparative testing of chosen parameters.

ISO 4628 1-6 Test: Assessment of blistering, chalking, cracking, flaking and rusting

Defines a system for designating the quantity and size of defects and the intensity of changes in the appearance of coatings and outlines the general principles of the system used throughout ISO 4628. This system is intended to be used, in particular, for defects caused by ageing and weathering, and for uniform changes such as colour changes, for example yellowing.

The other parts of ISO 4628 provide pictorial standards or other means of evaluating particular types of defect. As far as possible, already existing evaluation schemes have been used as the basis.

This part of ISO 4628 can also be used for assessing defects not covered by the other parts of ISO 4628.

In-house method Test: Assessment of light fastness

ISO inhouse method using a QUV apparatus with UVA 351 lamps

BS AU 148 Part 15 Test: Chip resistance

A method of providing information regarding the resistance of a paint system to chipping by the impact of gravel and grit thrown up from road surfaces.

BS 3900: Part A11 Test: Combustibility

Small scale test for combustibility (50/C)

ISO 2811-1 Test: Density

Determination of density (pyknometer method)

ISO 1517 and 9117 Test: Drying time

Specifies a test method for determining under standard conditions whether a single coat or a multi-coat system of paint, varnish or related material has reached the through-dry state after a specified drying period. The test procedure may also be used to determine the time taken to achieve that state.

ISO 2808 Test: Film thickness

Describes a number of methods that are applicable to the measurement of the thickness of coatings applied to a substrate. Methods for determining wet-film thickness, dry-film thickness and the film thickness of uncured powder layers are described. Reference is made to individual standards where these exist. Otherwise the method is described in detail.

The standard also defines terms concerning the determination of film thickness. (Method no 7)

BS EN 456 Test: Flash point

Method for determination of flashpoint of paints, varnishes and related products by the rapid equilibrium method

ISO 6860 Test: Flexibility

Describes an empirical test procedure for assessing the resistance of a coating of paint, varnish or related product to cracking and/or detachment from a metal substrate when subjected to bending around a conical mandrel under standard conditions.

For a multi-coat system, each coat may be tested separately or the complete system may be tested.

ISO 2813 Test: Gloss

Specifies a test method for determining the specular gloss of paint films using a reflectometer geometry of 20°, 60° or 85°. The 60° geometry is applicable to all paint films, but for very high gloss and near-matt films 20° or 85° may be more suitable. The 20° geometry is intended to give improved differentiation between high-gloss paint films. The 85° geometry is intended to give improved differentiation between low-gloss paint films. The method is not suitable for the measurement of the gloss of metallic paints.

ISO 1518 Test: Hardness

Specifies a test method for determining under defined conditions the resistance of a single coating or a multi-coat system of paint, varnish or related product to penetration by scratching with a hemispherically tipped needle.

BS 3900: Part F2 Test: Humidity

These tests give an indication of how well a painted surface will resist specified humidity/condensation conditions in the absence of corrosive pollutants. The methods all involve exposure to high humidity combined with a limited choice of temperatures. BS 3900-F2 is the most severe of the available test methods and the one that is most commonly used for paint testing. This test is normally carried out for 500 hours and a coating that shows no change in appearance after this time is judged to have good humidity resistance.

ISO 6272 Test: Impact resistance

Describes a method for evaluating the resistance of a dry film of paint, varnish or related product to cracking or peeling from a substrate when it is subjected to a deformation caused by a falling weight, with a 20-mm-diameter spherical indenter, dropped under standard conditions.

ISO 3251 Test: Non-volatile content

Specifies a method for determining the non-volatile-matter content by mass of paints, varnishes, binders for paints and varnishes, polymer dispersions and condensation resins such as phenolic resins (resols, novolak solutions, etc.).

The method is also applicable to formulated dispersions containing fillers, pigments and other auxiliaries (e.g. thickeners and film-forming agents). For the method to be usable for unplasticized polymer dispersions and rubber latices, the non-volatile residue (which consists essentially of the polymeric material and of small quantities of auxiliaries such as emulsifiers, protective colloids, stabilizers, solvents added as film-forming agents and - especially for rubber latex concentrate - preserving agents) has to be chemically stable under the test conditions. For plasticized samples, the residue, by definition, normally includes the plasticizer.

ASTM D 1653 Test: Permeability to water

One of the factors affecting the performance provided by an organic coating is its capability of resisting or aiding the passage of water vapor. In some services, for example, exterior wood and masonry, the coating has to allow moderate amounts of water vapor to pass through the film without damage to it. Hence, the water vapor transmission characteristics of coatings are important in assessing their performance in practical use.

The purpose of these test methods is to obtain values of water vapor transfer through coatings that range in permeability from high to low. These values are for use in design, manufacture, and marketing.

ASTM G85 Annex A5 Test: Prohesion

Dilute electrolyte cylic fog/dry test. This test is particularly relevant to paints on steel. It began its development in the 1960's when J.B. Harrison and T.C.K. Tickle began using a diluted mixture of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate to replace the 5% sodium chloride solution used in the Salt Spray test. Then in the 1970's F.D. Timmins along with Mebon Paint, a UK manufacturer of surface coatings decided to dilute the solution to its presently used concentration. They also reduced the solution temperature to ambient 35°C to more closely simulate natural weathering.

ISO 2812-1 Method 3 Test: Resistance to liquids and stains

Specifies general methods for determining the resistance of an individual-layer or multi-layer system of coating materials to the effects of liquids, other than water, or paste-like products (included implicitly in test liquids mentioned in the text).

These methods enable the testers to determine the effects of the test liquid on the coating and, if necessary, to assess the damage to the substrate.

In-house method Test: Resistance to temperature change

ISO inhouse method

ISO 2812-1 Test: Resistance to water immersion

Specifies general methods for determining the resistance of an individual-layer or multi-layer system of coating materials to the effects of liquids, other than water, or paste-like products (included implicitly in test liquids mentioned in the text).

These methods enable the testers to determine the effects of the test liquid on the coating and, if necessary, to assess the damage to the substrate.

ISO 7253 Test: Salt spray

Resistance to neutral salt spray

ISO 11998 Test: Scrub resistance and clean ability

The ability of coatings to withstand wear caused by repeated cleaning operations and to withstand penetration by soiling agents is an important consideration both from a practical point of view and when comparing and rating such coatings. ISO 11998:2006 describes an accelerated method for the determination of wet-scrub resistance. With regard to the cleanability of coatings, only the method itself and not the soiling agents are specified.

ISO 7254 Test: Spreading rate

Determination of natural spreading rate by brush application

ISO 3231 Test: Sulphur dioxide

The principle of the procedure specified is to expose a coated test panel to specified humid atmospheres containing sulfur dioxide. A volume of 0,2 litre, measured at atmospheric pressure, is generally recommended for testing coatings of thickness not exceeding approximately 40µm. The effects of exposure are evaluated by criteria agreed in advance between the interested parties, these criteria being usually of a subjective nature. Applies to single-coat film or a multi-coat system of paints.

In-house method Test: Temperature/ humidity exposure

Control temperature and humidity exposure

ISO 11890 Test: VOC content

ISO 11890-2:2006 is one of a series of standards dealing with the sampling and testing of paints, varnishes and related products.

It specifies a method for the determination of the volatile organic compound (VOC) content of paints, varnishes and their raw materials. ISO 11890-2 is preferred if the expected VOC content is greater than 0,1 % by mass and less than about 15 % by mass. When the VOC content is greater than about 15 % by mass, the less complicated method given in ISO 11890-1 may be used.

This method assumes that the volatile matter is either water or organic. However, other volatile inorganic compounds can be present and might need to be quantified by another suitable method and allowed for in the calculations.

ISO 3251 Test: Volume solids

Specifies a method for determining the non-volatile-matter content by mass of paints, varnishes, binders for paints and varnishes, polymer dispersions and condensation resins such as phenolic resins (resols, novolak solutions, etc.).

The method is also applicable to formulated dispersions containing fillers, pigments and other auxiliaries (e.g. thickeners and film-forming agents). For the method to be usable for unplasticized polymer dispersions and rubber latices, the non-volatile residue (which consists essentially of the polymeric material and of small quantities of auxiliaries such as emulsifiers, protective colloids, stabilizers, solvents added as film-forming agents and - especially for rubber latex concentrate - preserving agents) has to be chemically stable under the test conditions. For plasticized samples, the residue, by definition, normally includes the plasticizer.